journal journeying : finding ritual in tracking your flow

reflections on rhythmicity. . .

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Connecting to what day we are in our cycle every day is one of the simplest and most practical ways to start a relationship to your cycle. In this simple practice you’ll start each day by writing down what cycle day you’re on & end the day with some reflection.

By starting the day with the reminder of your cycle you’ll begin to notice trends and therefore expectations in what you may find challenging versus what your strengths for the particular day or phase may be. Over time I found the most powerful medicine of this practice to be one of self-compassion. Because when we know our changing selves we can show up with more understanding, nurturance, and acceptance of where we’re at. As I notice the subtle shifts in my energy, mood, sexuality, work life, and creativity, I am able to better accept “where I’m at” and simply meet myself there rather than wish or force another way of being. By starting each day reflecting on your cycle day, you’ll lean into flowing with the river rather than against it; while simultaneously beginning to set yourself up for success by setting realistic and compassionate expectations for yourself.

In this practice at the end of each day you’ll also record how the day went in your journal. This could look like a few words to sum up the day. But could also come in the form of story telling, stream of consciousness, or even a poem. By reflecting on the different dynamics present during your day you will begin to notice how some aspects may relate to your cycle.

t h e  p r a c t i c e . . .

Start the day by writing “day ___” in your journal or planner.

If you use a charting app, I’d recommend using a pen and paper approach for this particular way of checking in. Essentially start each day by writing in your journal, planner, or other platform of checking in with yourself “day 1, 2, 7, 14, 29” etc. Day 1 is the first day of menstruation; each day afterwards you count up until your next first day.  

At the end of the day chart in the same space how the day went. How did you feel? Were you energized or tired? Social or introverted? How was your sex drive? What naturally went well? & what was more challenging? As I said before, there are many ways to do this. Feel free to get creative. It doesn’t need to be a perfectly charted “this or that” tracking of data. Include the nuances and paradox’s. Speak in the tone of the energetics of your day. Draw an illustration next to your words. Do what comes naturally for you. Some days may be a long detailed story and recall of the entire day. Other days may be shorter or more poetic.

Don’t take it too seriously. You don’t necessarily need chart something every single day. If you miss some days, no worries. Perhaps the missing or showing up for the practice is indicative of how you were doing that day in it of itself.

Play with this practice. Try and see it as a fun way to check in with yourself rather than another thing to check off of your to do list.

Megan connComment